Light is Everything!

Archive for December, 2015

Farewell 2015!

20151231-LastDay-011

The Last Sunset of 2015! And, I finally got my Christmas lights working. Have a wonderful 2016 everybody!

20151231-LastDay-012

 +God’s Richest Blessings to you in 2016!+


Merry Christmas!

20151130-Xmas-001

We took our 2015 Christmas Card photo at Cypress Hills, Saskatchewan at a really cool destination called Conglomerate Cliffs. You can’t tell from the photo but there was a 500 billion mph wind the day we took this. The way the cliffs are we were able to get some wind protection. I had along with me my Alien Bee 1600, Vagabond Mini pack and a medium Photoflex litedome for the modifier. We lucked out and still caught some of the glorious fall colour that was still around in October. So from my family to you & yours, have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Christ is Born! Glorify Him!

+++


Grenfell in B&W

20151222-Grenfell-041

We just got back from the first half of Christmas holidays with my wife’s side of the family in Grenfell, SK. Rather than post cute pics of the kids opening Christmas presents, I figured I’d instead post this blog about a little photowalk I went on while I was there. The weather was mild but also very flat and almost bleak – the perfect scenario for black and white. I slammed the ol’ FujiFilm X100s into B&W mode and literally went to town. I was fun and refreshing to walk around and basically shoot street in a small town.


Fun with Rope Lights

At the Live Nativity, I lit the whole set with one strand of rope lights. I’ve always been impressed about how LEDs can kick out some serious lumens. I was thinking that you could actually use them for photography as a constant light source. So I plugged in the strand and held it up in front of the kids. It’s pretty cool light! And, it gives some pretty killer catch lights. You could manipulate the shape of the lights into anything you wanted and it would look cool. Chuck some cute kids in front of a christmas  tree with a fast 85 or 50mm lens and you’re golden.


TEDx – Apex Predators

20130921-HGreenwood-001

An Extremely Candid Photograph of Dr. Greenwood! 🙂

There are truly only very few moments in a person’s life when you enter a room and instantly know that  you are surrounded by giants. People so incredibly bright and knowledgable that they have already forgotten more than you will ever know. Being in a room with Dr. Hamilton Greenwood is one of those such moments. He is a brilliant biologist, educator and photographer and he has been a family friend for many years.

Recently he did a TEDx talk in Saskatoon, SK. His talk is perfectly woven together with his own stunning wildlife and nature photography from our great province of Saskatchewan. Check out the talk here, it is totally worth your time and you will be highly rewarded!

Description from the TEDx Talk:

Educator and Wildlife Photographer | Hamilton Greenwood is an adult educator and wildlife biologist with a passion for using photographs to inspire. He is the department head at Saskatchewan Polytechnic’s Natural Resource Technology Programs, and a sessional lecturer for both the University of Saskatchewan and the Saskatchewan Urban Native Teacher Education Program (SUNTEP). With an undergraduate degree in Biology from Queen’s University and a PhD from McGill, he has taught a generation of people who contribute to Natural Resource Management in Western Canada. As a teacher, he is known for the passion and commitment which be brings with him to his classrooms. Hamilton’s personal and professional life has found a wonderful bridge in landscape, wildlife and still-life photography. His images are widely published and freely shared with many non-governmental organizations. These photographs, and countless hours in the wild, are the canvasses from which he works.

20130921-HGreenwood-002

Dr. Greenwood in a rare moment of On-Camera Flash


Fun with Grids

20151214-WinterStrobi-001

I had to order something from B&H a while ago and to get free shipping to Canada, I needed to bump up my order. So I ordered a grid for my Photoflex Medium Litedom soft box. Grids are ridiculously expensive for softboxes, leading one to believe they are made of Unicorn Tears and Saskatchewan seal skin bindings. Or some such other mystical material. So I ordered the Impact brand 24×32 grid. It works and fits like a charm for the Photoflex box. I should have had a grid on that soft box from forever ago. They are so perfect for controlling light spill and adding amazing direction to the light. I hadn’t had a chance to even try it out much so I grabbed Ethan and some gear and we went outside to cash in on the amazing hoarfrost that stuck around all day.

20151214-WinterStrobi-004

In the really blue shots, I was playing with color temperature and gels. I went with a tungsten balance to shift the image to blue, then double CTO gelled my flash to bring the light back to a really nice warm temp. It’s a very interesting contrast in the light colours. For the other shots I used a simple overcast warmer temperature of around 6300K with a 1/4 CTO gel to give a bit warmer skin tone. The control that the grid gives is superb. There is no spill around the subject to illuminate everything. If you want to keep an image interesting, then pay close attention to what isn’t lit.

20151214-WinterStrobi-006

Our neighbour came home and I made her step into the set for a shot or two. It worked out well! I was using the FujiFilm X100s for these shots with the 3 stop ND filter engaged. This helped knock down the ambient light which would have been too much for a single LumoPro LP180 flash that I was using blasting through two gels, two layers of diffusion and the grid. These exposures were in the neighbourhood of f/2 1/250 ISO 200 plus or minus. And they are all JPEG images too. I seldom ever shoot my Fuji in RAW because the JPEGs are soooooooo great. Not so my Nikons. They live in RAW all the time. But Fuji has such incredible and captivating colour and skin tones. So, it’s JPEG for this Fuji slinging flashgun cowboy. So if you have a light, slap a grid on there and leave it there. You’ll be glad you did! 😎