Light is Everything!

Posts tagged “HDR eFex Pro

If you see it, shoot it!

This post is not intended to be a mantra for hunting season. Ahem. 😎 It’s about seizing the moment before it’s gone. The “capture” aspect of photography is really of the essence. Event photographers and wedding folk know this well. But even landscapers or point and shooters can glean a lesson from it. If a picture is happening before you, go shoot it. Don’t wait and come back later. Chances are good it won’t be there. Take the 5 minutes to stop, get out and make the frame. Like time, you can never get it back. And personally, I hate living with that “Doh! I wish I would have stopped and got that photo!” It applies to all of life.

This shot was one of those times. I was on my way back from a shoot and saw these 3 combines and the grain cart tractor parked in a harvested field. All of them red. With a nice little moon overhead. I had to stop. I pulled the car over and walked out into the field. I didn’t have a tripod but I had a step ladder with me. So, I used it as a rest and was able to take some frames to make this HDR image. I’m pleased with how it turned out as it grabs what harvest time on the prairies is all about. I could have drove past, but I’m glad I seized the moment! 😎

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Dusty Dam

Had to make a water run tonight to the supple bounty of Alameda. It was approaching golden light which is always exciting. It was also dusty as all get out. Dust, fog, mist – they are all the theme park of light. We lucked out and ran into much dust on the roads to let the sunset have the mucho fun. 😎


Feb 22 Sunset

Quick shot at the beginning of sundown tonight. 😎


HDR: Dead Winter

Capitalizing on the dismal fog, I ran out and came across this blast from the past. What a location! Old smashed farm house, decrepit stone barn ruins, racoon tracks hither and thither… it was a regular haunt of jackals! I was testing the VR function of the 16-35mm lens as I went with no tripod but was still able to do these HDR mashups with very little ghosting. Cool! 😎 I was really diggin’ the high contrast black and white feel when I was editing these ones. Adds to the overall bleakness… πŸ˜‰


Wild Sky Jan 26 2012

HDR! Boo ya! 😎


HDR Tutorial

This is a brief tutorial on making HDR images. There’s zillions of other posts/pages on the information super highway already so you can look up more info there about it. But this is how I do it. Which makes it infinitely better. 8) Just kidding! πŸ˜‰

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range. It’s been around forever conceptually, even since film days. But now, with digital it’s easy and fun. Get a camera and a tripod and find a scene that has loads of contrast: lots of lights and darks. The idea behind this kind of photography is to keep all the detail in the darks and in the light parts of the image. Because the camera currently cannot capture the same amount of dynamic range that the human eye can see, in one camera photo you don’t get as much range as you see with your eye. So, you take 3-7 photos of varied exposure and layer them together with software. I use Nik’s HDR eFex Pro.Β It’s super slick and comes with many final image presets you can apply to stylize the final image, making it look as surreal or as realistic as you want.

OK, here’s a sunset one I took the other night. And in all truth, it’s not how I typically do it. I was on top of my roof with my 70-300 lens and I did this handheld, which isn’t optimal. Get a tripod so there is no camera movement.

So, the first image: bang. Here it is.The camera meters the scene and determines that this is the best balance of light and dark. We get all that rich colour in the sky & the river. But the valley hills have gone dark and silhouetted the evergreen. This was at ISO 400 f/8 70mm and the shutter was 1/100.

Β The next shot speeds the shutter up to 1/200, recording an even darker, more saturated image. This one gives the mad colour, but kills off almost all the detail in the hills.The third image washes out the sky but it lifts the details up out of the hills with a slower shutter speed of 1/50. All three images are 1 stop of light apart from each other.
Now, technically, it would be better to get a couple more images here to further lift the details out of the dark regions. But, as I mentioned, this was handheld. If you have a tripod it’s easy to do.

Then, after feeding the photos into the Nik software (I use it as a plug in with Aperture) you can arrive at the final HDR image. There’s loads of darks and lights, rich colours and highlight detail that otherwise would have been lost. HDR is having your cake and eating it too. 8) When you stylize the image, you can make it look wild with texture, like I did here to make the clouds go boom. But you can also finish them to look realistic too which I did for this photo of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Regina. The light pouring in from that window would have made getting a balanced exposure difficult.

So there you go, a quick tutorial on HDR. Always use your histogram to see if you’ve clipped any highlights or darks in the image. 8)